Podcast Rant – At Least It’s A Short One

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Image result for Rant public domain imagesWell, Hello out there. How in the world are you? I hope you are faring well so far in 2020. I know that many parts of the world have no idea what time of year it is. The weather is absolutely crazy. It’s quite normal here in Northern Scotland. And for that I say, yay.

How are you doing with your New Year’s resolutions? As I understand it, this is the time of year, most people have given up. Yep, it’s after the 21st. The majority of weight loss, fitness, financial, and even spiritual resolutions are now officially banished.

How sad is that. We’re only 3 weeks in. I guess that’s one reason, years ago, I stopped new years resolutions. I spend time in November and early December setting and writing down goals for the new year. I don’t make too many, and I try and make them challenging. But after only 3 weeks into the new year, I haven’t had enough time to even assess most of them, much less abandon them.

One of my goals for 2020 is related to the book of 1 Corinthians, that I’ve started preaching from on Sundays. Please let me explain. In the first chapter of the letter, Paul asks the Corinthians to be united. He reminds them that unity is the plan for God’s Church. When we fight, fuss, and divide, it goes public and ends up giving the Church a bad name.

Paul tells them he’s heard how some of them say, I follow Paul. Others say, I follow Peter, still others, I follow Apollos, and still others, I only follow Christ. What the heck is this? Is Christ divided into Camps.

This is the first Century version of I’m a Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, Holiness, Catholic, Protestant, Spirit Filled, or Evangelical. What the heck does any of that mean to people who don’t know squat about the Gospel. For that matter, what does it mean to those of us who do?

The body of Christ has become so splintered that we’ve lost much of our substance as witnesses, and the rest of the world just tunes us out. We have nothing to say that even interests them.

And to make matters worse, we fight about stuff publicly. It’s ugly. Just do a quick search on You Tube. We see Christians calling each other all kinds of names. We see all kinds of body slams, and kicks to the throat. Punches and clinches. We have turned the Gospel of Christ into the UFC. We are unkind and uncool. And what’s even more true, we are embarrassing Jesus.

Many of the things we’re fighting about on YouTube, should not be there. Those are family issues that should be dealt with in private. When we are publicly shaming other people who claim Christ, we look totally petty to those who don’t know anything about Him or His gospel.

I would agree that when someone denies the fundamentals of the Gospel, we need to address that. But you see, all denominations: Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and every Protestant group, believes that Jesus Christ came as a man, he died for sin, he was buried, he rose from the dead, and he will return again, to finish our salvation (bring Heaven), and to judge the world. Yes, there are those who deny some of these facts. Those people are not a part of us. But if we preach the truth of those things, the false teachers will lose influence and drift away. But much of the stuff we fight about publicly, is not regarding those fundamentals. They are things like, Calvinists and Arminians fighting nuances to the death. On YouTube. While the Non Christian goes, What the Heck? Or fighting over the details of Jesus return. Will there be a secret rapture? Will there be a literal 1000 year reign on the earth? Instead we should shout our agreement, Jesus is coming. Will He find Faith on the Earth?

Before any of us hits send on another video, we need to ask ourselves, what will this do for the Gospel. What about non Christians, or New Christians who see it, Will it bring them towards Him, or will it just turn them off and make them think Christians can’t get their act together, so why should I listen to them.

There are things we need to address. But privately. In our Churches. In our small groups. In our conferences, that are not appropriate for places like YouTube. That goes for our political opinions. I have loads of non Christian friends and family who have totally different political view that I have. Things related to crime and punishment, Gun control, who would make a good president. In all of history, I don’t believe a single person has ever been pursuaded to change his or her mind be cause of a facebook post. But plenty of friendships have been lost, or relationships ruined, by it.

I’m not suggesting to avoid all controversy, but I am saying, stop calling people names. It’s kind of like in 1 Corintians 6, when Paul has to get on to the Church for suing each other in public court. All that does is make the whole church look bad. He says it’s better to just lose something, rather that drag our dirty laundry through the streets. We might win our case, but lose the public.

Ok, that’s my rant over. What do you think of all the Christian infighting on Social Media and YouTube. Hmm. I gues YouTube is a part of Social Media, but you get my point. Write me and let me know what you think. But be respectful if you disagree. Send me an email, samburtonpresents@gmail.com, or just use the comments section of the show notes, samburtonpresents.com.

We’ll talk more soon. And we’ll probably talk longer next time. You have an awesome week. For now, I’m out.

It’s All About That Grace!

 

ReDiscovering The Bible Online Radio Show

Episode 25 – Ephesians

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Notes:

So glad to be back after some time away. I didn’t expect to be gone quite so long, but life is full of surprises. More experienced podcasters have a few episodes in the bank so that when things come up, they don’t have a gap in broadcasts. I’m not that smart, but I thank you all for your patience and I’m back in the saddle.

This week we’re looking at Paul’s letter to the Ephesians and it’s especially interesting because the Ephesian Church may well be the congregation Paul had the strongest relationship with. It was certainly the place he stayed the longest, a full 3 years.

You can read all about the dramatic founding of the Church in Ephesus, including the miracles, growth, and opposition in the 19th Chapter in Acts. In fact, that chapter is so exciting, I encourage you, if you’re in a place to do so, pause the show right now and go read Acts 19. If you can’t do so at the moment, go back and do so at your earliest opportunity.

This Church is so important to Paul, that later, when he is on his way to Jerusalem, he summons them to join him for a meeting at Miletus (about 38 miles south of Ephesus) when his ship docks there for a short time.

During that meeting he shares many insights with the elders and in 20:15 he mentions that they will they will never see each other again. After that statement, Paul warns them about false teachers and other trouble makers who will try and break up the Church.

At the end of Paul’s speech, there is a great deal of weeping as they pray and say their goodbyes. Verse 38 says the thing the Ephesians were most sad about was that they would never see him again.

I find that one of the most tender passages in the New Testament. Paul loved these people very much and they loved him just as much.

Sometime after Paul leaves, probably around AD 63, Paul writes the letter we call the Book of Ephesians.

It appears that following Paul’s death, Ephesus becomes one of the most prominent Churches in the Kingdom., certainly in the province of Asia. After Paul’s death, it becomes the home of the Apostle John. According to some traditions, when John moved there, Mary, the mother of Jesus was still alive and moved with him.  John did his writing from Ephesus (and maybe some on Patmos) and Ephesus was the first of the 7 Churches Jesus dictated special letters to in the Book of Revelation (see chapter 2).

Ephesus is no little backwater place like Galatia, but rather the most important city in Asia Minor. Over time, it had replaced Troy (troas) and was a prominent port, trade, education and religious center. It’ a large and influential place.

As we look through the book, we find some of the most important and central doctrines of Christianity within it’s 6 small chapters.

It also contains a few verses (Chapter 1, verses 4-7) that are among the most contentious verses in all of Christianity. So let’s take a quick look at those verses and see if we can’t clear up some of the misunderstanding.

Most of the confusion comes from verse 5 and the word ‘predestined’. It says, ‘He predestined us us for adoption as sons…’ That word connotes for many people an assumption that God individually selects certain people for salvation and others to miss out. Entire denominations and ‘Theologies’ have been built around that concept. Millions have feared they are left out or that loved ones are left out because of ‘predestination’. Many have turned away from Christ because of the idea that this would either negate the loving nature of God, or that it eliminates the free will of man.

If we look a little deeper, however, the explanation is much more hopeful and inclusive. This kind of misunderstanding is what comes from focusing on a single word pulled out of its context with the rest of the Bible.

Let’s put it back in context and see what happens. Back in verse 4 Paul writes that ‘he chose us in Him before the foundation of the world….”  Keep in mind, Paul has already addressed this in a letter he wrote to the Church in Rome some years before this one. In chapter 8, verse 29, he wrote, “Those He foreknew, He predestined.”

Here he is saying the same thing.  God knows everything. Before we were ever born, God knew that millions would be willing to accept that we are sinners and turn to Him, so, in His Grace, He created a plan of redemption that He Implemented even before the world was created. That’s all that’s meant by predestination here. It isn’t that God selected some and not others. He selected ALL who would follow Him by creating an avenue of redemption. So in verse 5, (everything is plural). When He is talks about Predestination he is referring to the Church as a whole.

Remember, Paul is writing to the whole congregation and explaining that our salvation is God’s work, not ours. He planned everything from before the beginning. We didn’t create it and we don’t deserve it. It’s a gift of His Grace.

It’s all explained in Chapter2. We must always remember that chapters and verses are not a part of the original, so we shouldn’t let them divorce us from the way the entire message fits together.

In Chapter 2, Paul zooms in on this subject by highlighting Grace as the source of salvation. The decision to offer forgiveness is God’s alone,

BTW, This is the chapter that provides the verses that led me to title this episode, “It’s all about that Grace”.

In verses 4 and 5 Paul talks about God’s mercy and His grace, which are the heart of His Salvation. In verse 4 God’s love for us, despite all our rebellion and screw ups is the motivation behind salvation. Wow.

Let’s take a quick side road for a minute. It’s not unusual for us to hear about God’s Mercy and Grace and not think about the difference between them. Understanding that difference can make us really appreciate what God has done for us.

Mercy is God withholding from us the punishment we deserve. Jesus took that in our place.

Grace,on the other hand, is God giving us what we don’t deserve, forgiveness and new life.

Verse 8 is the key to the whole chapter. Let’s read it. ‘For it is by grace you have been saved through faith. It is not your own doing, it is the gift of God.

There is nothing you or I can do to gain salvation. We can’t pray enough, work enough, preach enough, be baptized enough, give enough or any enough. Salvation is by God’s favor upon us, pure and simple.

Salvation is by Grace, period. Yes, we must respond to His Grace, but we have nothing to do with creating it or making it available. Grace. Period. That’s the list. The end.

Just one more thought before we go. Neither grammatically nor contextually is there a comma after saved in verse 8. The emphasis in verse 8 and 9 is not comparing faith to works, but comparing grace to works. And also, grammatically, it is Grace that is the gift of God. Not faith that is the gift of God. The entire section has grace as its focus. There are several denominations that make Faith the gift, but grammatically and contextually, that just doesn’t fit.

When all is said and done, I’m so glad our Salvation is in God’s hands, rather than ours, because I would screw it up like I do everything else. Instead, I am confident that the one who made me, loves me, and sustains me is the one who guarantees my hope. I hope you’re glad about that, too.

Moving on, the heart of the book, from chapters 3 on are dedicated to instructions for living. They are incredibly practical and straight to the point. Some of the things, particularly in chapter 5 about families are controversial in our post modern 21st century, but remain a basic part of Christian doctrine and practice, at least in Bible Believing Churches.

Before we go, I want to spend just  minute in Chapter 6. Paul is getting ready to close, but just before asking for prayer and offering final greetings, Paul reminds the Ephesians that we are at war. Our battle is not merely a political or physical one, but is spiritual. He reminds them that if we are at war, we need to be prepared. So he advises them, and by extension, us, to put on ‘the full armor of God

I love it as he paints a word picture of a Roman soldier and uses the soldier’s armor as a model for our spiritual war.

He begins with the belt of truth which gives us flexibility and mobility.

The breastplate of righteousness covers our hearts

The Gospel is on our feet as shoes laced up for movement. The Gospel is meant for going, not standing still.

The shield of faith, puts out the flaming arrows launched our way by the Enemy.

Salvation is described as our helmet. The truth of our hope in Christ isn’t just something we feel, it’s something we KNOW. It is part of our intellect and not merely emotional.

The sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God is the Scripture. Our great weapon is for hand to hand combat and is the only weapon mentioned. Our defense and our offense is not primarily built on our testimony, but on the Bible.

This analogy about armor is key to our understanding of how to be prepared to deal with opposition.

And that’s all I’ve got. As always, please do your own homework. Use the comments section on the show notes at samburtonpresents.com to share your thoughts and questions. Or…email me: samburtonpresents@gmail.com.

Next week we’ll take a look at Colossians and “The God Particle”. Until then, be blessed, and, be a blessing.