Why I Don’t Want To Walk With You. Yes, You! (A ‘Transformation’ Supplemental)

Alone on the trailIt’s not you, it’s me.  So said many a soul trying to break a heart as gently as possible.   Sometimes, though, it’s true. Sometimes people just can’t be with others.

When it comes to exercise, that’s me.  As it turns out, I need to be alone. I have to work out, and, walk, alone, sans company.  It’s not personal. It’s just a fact. Here are some of the reasons:

  1. It’s my quiet time. I need time alone with God every day. I don’t just want it. I need it. It’s my time to pray and talk with Him. Maybe you pray. Maybe you don’t. I do.  My morning walk is where I do my best praying.
  2. It’s my ‘me’ time. I’m an extrovert. I expend a great deal of energy being with people. I love being wired that way, but the simple truth is, I need regular significant ME time. I need to get away from anything that even smells of responsibility. In the old days, that was during my daily time training my sled dogs. Once the dogs hit the trail, it was just the dogs, nature, God and me. I could tune out the real world and just be. I treasured those miles and minutes. After we moved south and I had to give up my dogs, I found my space in my morning farm chores. I would be up early, feeding and watering all the livestock and taking care of the garden. Now that farming is mostly behind me, my chores only take a few minutes in the morning. In the past few weeks, I’ve rediscovered peace and harmony in my morning walk. That’s probably weird, but it’s definitely true.
  3. It’s my most creative time. When I’m walking in the morning, or doing my exercise, I can mentally work on books, blog posts, podcasts, sermons, and a host of other creative projects. I can’t do that if someone is walking with me. I will only focus on the person or people with me.
  4. Walking with someone is distracting. When the going gets tough, I like to let my mind wander. I want to think about writing, or teaching, or just the nature around me. I want to think about anything except the work I’m involved in. If people are around, I can’t get lost in the moment. All I can hear is the footsteps and breathing of my companions. All I can think about is my exploding lungs or weakening muscles.
  5. Walking or exercising with companions makes my workout harder and takes me off my plan. First of all, I’m too sociable. I will want to talk with my companion(s) and talking throws off my breathing and rhythm.  When that happens, I get short of breath and tired too soon.  I really don’t want to have a stroke. That would seriously mess with my goals.  Also, because I’m slower than EVERYONE, I will subconsciously speed up which will mess with my distance.  The breathing and pace of those walking with me will silently influence my own. I hate peer pressure. 😉
  6. Getting thrown off my game makes me grumpy. And I don’t want to be grumpy. I’m not bothered by the fact that you are faster than me, or are a better athlete than I am. I have a plan, a goal.  I need to stick to it. If I’m thrown off that plan, I tend to melt down.

I love being a social butterfly. I love people. Chances are I’m fond of you; just not while I’m trying to focus on my quiet time.  I would love to spend time with you before my exercise time, and I would love to spend time with you after my exercise time. We can drink coffee, sip on iced tea, and chat or argue, or bear one another’s burdens, or any of a number of activities, but I need my tiny fragment of time alone.

I don’t know whether that sounds crazy, or whether it registers with you, but hopefully, it will at least help you understand that while I want you in my life, I don’t want you in my exercise program. I have no problem seeing you at the park or in the gym. In fact, I’m comforted if people I care about are there. Just do your thing, I’ll do mine, then we’ll change the world together.

Thanks for understanding.

Herding Gluttons

GluttonEpisode 32

Titus

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I’m in the studio on Monday. Yay, I love being back on schedule.

I need a favor. Prayer Network for Scotland. If you believe in Prayer. If you believe in the Great Commandment and the Great Commission, If you are Scottish, If you love Scotland, If you are a friend of this show I would really appreciate it, if you would join our network of prayer partners. There is no catch. There is no gimmick. We are simply seeking to gather a circle of Christian Scots and Albafiles together to pray for Scotland; her Believers, her Churches, her Leaders and her needs, both physical and spiritual. Here’s how to get started. 1. Go to Points North Scotland on facebook and like the page. 2. Send me a PM, an email or comment on the show notes page and let me know you want to Pray for Scotland. Please include your email address.  I will soon announce a private Facebook group and send you a personal invitation to join.  Thanks. Also, send me any questions. I’m delighted to answer.

Ok, commercial over, let’s move on to our topic.

Titus

Titus is a little known, but obviously important protoge of Paul, much like Timothy. When I say, little known, I truly mean it. He is only mentioned 13 times in the New Testament and 8 of those are in 2 Corinthians.

We know absolutely nothing about his background. He is never mentioned by Luke in Acts. His name is a gentile one, and we have that confirmed in Galatians 2:1, which is the first time he is ever mentioned.

In that chapter, Paul mentions that Titus traveled with Paul to the council in Jerusalem that is recorded in Acts 15. I find it interesting that Luke, another Gentile companion of Paul, makes no mention of Titus in his account of the council. It’s not a big deal, but I do find it curious.

Since the first mention of Titus is in the letter to the Galatians, it indicates the Churches are familiar. Also, since the visit to Galatia is the beginning of the end of the first Journey and the beginning of the second journey, and that Titus travels to Jerusalem with Paul, I’m going to suggest, that like Timothy, he is from one of the Galatian cities.

It is very interesting to me that the trip to Jerusalem as all about stopping the Judaiser attempts to force Gentile converts to obey the law, which is the primary theme of Galatians where Titus is first called by name. Then as we read through the letter to Titus, we will discover the same topic is a major theme it Paul’s letter to his young disciple.

The letter is very similar to 1 Timothy, albeit a much shorter. After studying the book this last week, I now believe Titus was probably written about the same time as I Timothy and possibly right before. The primary reason I say that is it appears from I Timothy 1, Paul seems to be on his way FROM Macedonia and is planning to meet Timothy in Ephesus. In Titus 3, he asks Titus to come to him in Nicopolis, which is a town in Macedonia. In episode 30, I suggested Timothy was written first. Now I think Titus may be a few months earlier than I Timothy. Still, the similarity in their content is so similar that they were very likely written near the same time.

Crete is an island south and slightly east of Greece, and virtually due west of Cyprus. In today’s vernacular, the insult, “Cretan” is a derisive term with historical roots in the decadent, immoral past of Crete’s cultural. Here in Titus, Paul mentions that one of the poets of ancient Crete, called the inhabitants of the island, ‘Liars and lazy gluttons.’

If you do a little digging, you’ll discover that the poet mentioned was also a philosopher named, ‘Epimenedes’. He lived in 600 B.C.

As an aside, he is also the indirect source of the altar ‘to the unknown God’ in Athens that Paul describes in Acts 17.

By the first century A.D. Crete is home to a large Jewish population. Acts Chapter 2, says there were Jews from Crete in Jerusalem on the Day of Pentecost and were among those who heard the Apostles speaking in tongues and were exposed to Peter’s Gospel Sermon that day. Seeing that it was not unusual for celebrants at Pentecost to have been residing in the city since Passover, it isn’t a stretch to suggest that many of them were witnesses to the Passion and Resurrection events of that earlier holiday.

It would be my educated guess that some of them were among the 3,000 baptized on Pentecost and that they became the nucleus of the first Christian congregation when they returned home. That would make the Church on Crete one of the oldest congregations in the Roman Empire.

The only time Luke records that Paul visited there was on his journey to Rome. According to Acts chapter 27, the ship was first on one part of the island, where ‘we spent a long time’ and then left for a safe harbor along the coast to winter in. It was while sailing up the coast of Crete they encountered the storm that blew them out to sea and after two weeks hit a sand bar and shipwrecked off the coast of Malta.

I guess this would be a good time to fill in some of the blanks related to Paul’s history and imprisonments. The book of Acts ends with Paul in Prison in Rome. Most conservative scholars call this his ‘first’ imprisonment. In piecing together the timeline of his letters, it appears that Paul was released briefly and made some short trips, including the visit to Macedonia mentioned here and in I Timothy. Some ancient legends say he even traveled as far as Britain in between imprisonments. I think that would be cool, but I just don’t believe there was enough time in between for such a long journey. Anyway, sometime after AD 64 he is arrested and was executed between 65 and 67. II Timothy was written during this second imprisonment.

If you have any thoughts or questions about that, by all means email them or use the comments section of the show notes.

Based on Chapter 1 here in Titus, Paul apparently went to Crete another time, or he left Titus there during his voyage to Rome and Titus was there a VERY long time. The former idea is more likely.

Again, from chapter 1, it looks like there were several congregations on the island. Titus is going to ‘set things in order’ and appoint elders to oversee the congregations. It looks like from that, and the doctrinal challenges, in all likelihood the churches were rather loose and disorganized. Titus was tasked with fixing that. I bet that was fun….not!

Paul goes on to give the same instruction to Titus about the characteristics of Elders that he gives to Timothy. He does not, however, include anything about deacons here.

Verse 10 in chapter 1 sets the major tone for the rest of the letter. He finishes the chapter with this subject then returns to it in verse 9 of chapter 3.

Chapter two is focused on relationships with other people; older and younger, just like Paul writes in I Timothy, but then that shouldn’t be too surprising if he wrote them about the same time.

Let’s go back to chapter 1, verse 10 and look at the problems the Cretan churches were facing. Paul says the Churches are dealing with all kinds of false doctrines and money hungry preachers. The thing these rogues have in common is they all have a Jewish heritage.

One of the banes of Paul’s ministry was that group called the Judaizers who followed the Apostle from town to town, stirring up trouble trying to coerce Believers to follow the law of Moses in addition to the Gospel. Paul devotes large portions of his letters to Galatia and Philippi to them; and even alludes to them in both Ephesians and Colossians.

It appears that because of the large Jewish Population in the island and the loosely organized nature of the Churches that these false teacher are pretty much running amok. Poor Titus has the unenviable task of shutting them down.

Having been in the position of confronting false teachers myself, it’s a scary, nerve wracking, and exhausting experience. And dealing with families who have been influenced and victimized by false teaching (and just like with Crete, it always goes back to money), there can be a lot of work and healing to do.

Here in chapter 1, Paul calls it rebellious, deceitful nonsense. He also says it’s shameful and that they must be silenced.

Over in Chapter 3 he calls it, Stupid, worthless and useless.

Pay very close attention to verse 10 in chapter 3

Tit 3:10 Give at least two warnings to those who cause divisions, and then have nothing more to do with them

here in the 21st century, in our culture of ‘tolerance’, we’re not supposed to ‘judge’. Paul has no such compunction. If the teaching is false, he says, shut it down. Peter and John are going to make similar statements in their letters. Stay tuned; no spoilers today.

Doctrine is important. Eternity is at stake. There are many things that are open for discussion, but some things like the Deity of Christ, His death and resurrection, salvation by Grace through faith rather than by obedience to the Law of Moses are not among the debatable. And those who try and spread false doctrine are to be silenced, not tolerated.

In our day, it’s a risky position to take, but we absolutely must. There is a lot of goofy stuff being taught out there and not all of it is harmless. This is why it is mission critical to have strong, capable, knowledgeable, faithful leaders, who can defend the truth and train the next generation so that God’s Church is full of GRACE and TRUTH. We need both if we’re going to be a light in dark places as we await Jesus return.

And that’s all I got. Go back and read Titus as soon as you can. This tiny letter was not merely written to a young preacher 2k years ago. It’s written to you…and me.

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Episode 13 – Prime Directive Part 4 –

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Luke 10:1-11

  1. A model for world evangelism.
  2. There’s nothing wrong with the harvest, there’s just a shortage of farmers.
  3. Step 1. Pray. Bless
  4. Step 2. Stay Remain in the same house
  5. Step 3. Care. Heal the sick. Find a need and meet it. Find a hurt and heal it. Meet physical needs
  6. Step 4. Share. Announce the arrival of the Kingdom.

Seek Heaven. Identify with community. We’re not a hit and run, one night stand kind of kingdom.. Meet felt needs. They can only be truly learned by being there and identifying. It’s only when a community can see how much care that they will care about what we say. But in the end, all the praying and caring in the world, only matters once we share the Gospel.

Here’s a link for the 1984 edition of the NIV Bible

Thanks for stopping by; Please use the comments section for questions or feedback. We love interacting.

Immigration, Crisis or Opportunity? 8 Things Christians Should Be Doing RIGHT NOW To Respond To The Situation

RefugeesHmm…What to do on a slow December day? Make popcorn? Watch Downton Abbey for the zillionth time?  Oh, I know, let’s blog about a ‘hot button’ issue; I choose…Immigration. After all, I can tell from my Facebook and Twitter feeds that almost everyone has an opinion, whether the subject is illegal immigration (particularly) from South of the border, or accepting Syrian (Muslim) refugees. Now, that should warm things up on a cold winter’s day.

Here’s the catch, though, I don’t want to discuss the political or national debate/implications, I wish to examine how I believe the Church should respond, and some reasons why I believe as I do.

This post will be especially hard to swallow for those of us from a more politically conservative ideology. The things I’m about to propose may feel counterintuitive to that demographic, because we have so mingled our faith commitment and our patriotic commitment that sometimes they have become identical in our thinking and are difficult to separate.

What happens, then, when situations arise that create a conflict between the Great Commandment, the Great Commission, and our American Patriotic commitment to our understanding of the Constitution? In such an event, which side will we come down on?

I have found myself in just such a predicament as a result of our current immigration debates. I have some strongly held political views which I will not discuss here.  I will however, make a couple of observations related to our immigration situation, and make some suggestions as to how I believe the Church should respond.

We have somewhere between 12 million and 20 million illegal immigrants in the country right now, with many more on the way. Most, but by no means all, are from Spanish speaking countries, arriving by way of our border with Mexico.

Our Government has decided to offer political refugee status to a large number of individuals and families from the war torn Middle East. We are expecting many thousands more in 2016. The vast majority of these refugees are Muslims and many appear to have militant ties.

Politically, these two situations are true hot potatoes and will likely play a major role in next year’s general election. For the Church, however, they may present and unprecedented opportunity.

Allow me to explain:

The two great driving forces of the Christian Faith are what we call ‘The Great Commandment’ and ‘The Great Commission’.

The Great Commandment is, “Love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, mind and strength, and, Love your neighbor as you love yourself’ (Matthew 22:36-40).  Interestingly, in the parable of the ‘Good Samaritan’ (Luke 10:25-37), Jesus equated the command ‘love your enemies’, with loving neighbor as self.

The Great Commission, found in all four Gospels and the book of Acts, is the command to take the good news of Jesus to every person on earth. Probably the best known account is Matthew 28:18-20.

Both the command and the commission have been the catalyst for the Christian missionary movement since the Church was born on a Spring Sunday morning circa A.D. 30. They drive our efforts at charity and service as well as our desire to evangelize.

In recent years, for a variety of reasons, mission activity has been curtailed, with the number of missionaries falling rapidly and the number of places welcoming Christian missionaries on the decrease.

Some of the reasons for the decline are financial, some are due to priority juggling, many are certainly political, and there others I have neither the time nor space to catalog.

God’s desire for the salvation of the human race, however, has not diminished, so since we have curtailed our international activities, He has, in His providence, brought the world to us.

Perhaps He brought them to us because in some cases we WOULD not go.  As I mentioned, on the whole, our missionary presence around the world has been on the decline for 2 generations. Back in the late 70s when I was first planning to go to the field, one statistic being tossed around was that for every 10 missionaries retiring or leaving the field, only one was being raised up to replace them. The situation has not improved in the last 40 years.

Resources to fund full time missions are drying up. The Southern Baptist Mission Board, for example, announced major cutbacks earlier this year, including human resources, due to financial challenges they face. Most other denominations and fellowships have similar, if less public, stories to tell.

It is my opinion that a large percentage of the financial problems are priority based, both on the individual and congregational levels. For the sake of time, I will save those opinions for another day. Feel free to ask me what I mean.

In some cases, perhaps He brought them here because we COULD not go. The majority of Muslim immigrants (refugees), for example, are from places that were long ago closed to evangelistic activities. It is extremely difficult and not safe to serve in those places. (I pray regularly for the few who have risked much to go to these places in Jesus’ name.)

Similarly, our Universities and corporations are home to many thousands of bright young men and women from places like China (among others), where overt mission activity is difficult.

The glorious truth is, whether we WOULD not, or COULD not go, millions of previously unreached souls are HERE. They are in our communities, our schools, our workplaces. What an opportunity! And we don’t even need a passport to reach out.

Look at all the money we save by reaching out to internationals living among us. We already have access to good nutrition and health care. We have clean water, we have Church buildings and literature and transportation. The open door for reaching these millions of souls is incredible.

As regards those from ‘closed’ countries, it is much safer for them to be exposed to the Gospel here, than in their home countries. And it is certainly safer for those who respond to the message.

For that matter, it is safer for us to share with immigrants that it would be if we travelled to their homelands. We’re not going to be arrested and tortured for proselytizing. That has to be a blessing.

I’m not suggesting that the ‘results’ will be any greater among people hostile to Christianity if we reach out to them here, but the odds are, it’s a whole lot safer all around.  Besides, our job is to Go and Tell. God handles the results.

Over the years, those of us from Evangelical traditions, have at one time or another had our heart strings tugged by a presentation about people from exotic places around the world who received medical attention, got an education, had access to good food and clean water and/or heard about Jesus because someone went to them and we heard their stories. We rejoiced at the news.

21st Century America is like waking up tonsil deep in missionary opportunities. Regardless of our political views on the cause, we should rejoice at what God has brought our way. And we should respond by doing all we can to fulfill the Great Commandment and Great Commission to the millions of lonely, confused, and yes, even criminal souls among us.  I want to finish this post with some action steps to get started taking advantage of the doors God has opened.

  1. Begin praying for the immigrants and refugees in your community.
  2. Contact Bible Societies and Scripture distribution ministries for getting Bibles and other literature in the languages of the newcomers to your area.
  3. Reach out to Missionary agencies that already have ministries to the various countries from which your immigrants have come. They could be a valuable resource in finding ways to serve and assimilate your new residents.
  4. Gather your local Church outreach teams, leaders and prayer warriors to pray and brainstorm on what you can do to serve and reach the immigrants and refugees already among you.
  5. Befriend and serve the foreigners among you. Think about how you would feel if you suddenly found yourself far from home, in a strange land, with strange customs and maybe even a language you don’t understand.
  6. Keep in mind, not all immigrants are alike. For example: Mexicans, Nicaraguans and El Salvadorans all speak Spanish, but have different dialects/accents, different cultures and even different political and social viewpoints. Similarly, those from Islamic countries are not a single culture or even religious viewpoint. An example would be that a Shiite from Iran, a Sunni from Saudi Arabia and an Achmadiyya from Pakistan will have major differing views on the Quran.
  7. Pastors and Small Group leaders, should preach and teach on being open hearted, open handed, service oriented and evangelistically focused.
  8. Ask yourself, with all sincerity, ‘What would Jesus do?’

As I close, I want to remind you of some words from the Apostles John and Peter, and some words of Jesus as quoted by Matthew. John wrote, “For God so loved the world that He gave his only begotten son, that whoever believes in Him, should not perish, but have everlasting life” (John 3:16).  Peter reminds us, “God is not willing that any should perish, but that everyone should come to repentance 2 Peter 3:9).” And Matthew records these words of Jesus, “Come to me all of you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. (Matthew 11:28)”.

I love discussion, so please offer your thoughts in the comments section. And, if you, your congregation, or your small group, would like specific suggestions for your area, please email me or use the contact form on the website.

Scotland, St. Andrews Day, And Unfinished Business

scotroadmap1.jpg (1152×1279)Happy St. Andrew’s Day, Y’all.  Andrew is considered the Patron Saint of Scotland and Nov. 30 is his traditional feast day.

Thirty five years ago I spent my first St. Andrew’s Day in  Scotland. It was glorious. Hard, but glorious. I was living in a drafty two bedroom upstairs apartment above the home of one of the elders of the Church I’d gone to try and help turn around. (incidentally, he went into hospital the day I moved in and died about three days later.).

The apartment had a coin operated electric meter, so as long as I kept a stash of 50 pence pieces, there were lights and heat, but on more than one occasion, this poor missionary and his children were left in the cold and dark.

For an office, I set up a table and some bookshelves in a back corner of the worship center at the Church. I added a desk lamp and and a small oil filled space heater that I kept under the table I used as a desk. The heater more or less kept my toes from freezing, but not much more. Most days, I did my best Bob Cratchit impersonation, wearing my hat, coat, scarf and gloves as I prepared my sermons, wrote newsletters and letters to supporters and performed other sundry office tasks. The silver lining was, visiting the homes of local residents and Church members meant a hot cup of tea and sitting in front of a warm fire.

As a rookie missionary, I had very little financial support in those days, but I had big dreams and big faith. I KNEW God had called me and if He had called me, He would also sustain me. He did not disappoint.

I lived seven incredible years in a Northeast fishing village with the somewhat romantic name of Buckie. Some of my fondest memories were made there. Some of the dearest friendships I’ve ever known were forged there, along the shoreline of the Moray Firth. A piece of my heart remains and still beats for the people of my adopted home.

I wasn’t ready to go when the time came for me to leave. Pressure from my board of directors and some financial supporters led me to depart Buckie for the larger cities of the Scottish midlands. It would not be surprised if my DNA was discovered from the remnants of tear stains on the sidewalks in Buckie and Forres, where I prayed, preached and wept so hard for Revival.

After a scouting trip to Glasgow and it’s surrounds, I chose Cumbernauld as the next stop in my Scottish adventure. Unlike the pristine, postcard fishing village I was leaving behind, Cumbernauld was a manufactured, concrete jungle inhabited by mostly the underpaid and unemployed, ranging from  salt of the earth types to the dregs of society. And I loved them. Some of them I love still. And my heart grieves that I was torn from them by the very talons of Hell.

Twenty five years ago today, my life began to unravel as the Enemy of man’s soul unleashed upon me and my family all the fury of his infernal anger and treachery. The storm lasted not days or weeks, but years, until all that was left of my life were the ashes of the pieces of my shattered dreams.

I left my beloved Caledonia a broken shell, so different than the hopeful dreamer who once warmed himself with visions of revival in the land that gave us names like, John Knox, David Livingstone, and Eric Liddell, when so little warmth was available from his little oil filled radiator.

Today, as the conflicting anniversaries and memories collide inside my heart, I am keenly aware, in between memories of great joy and indescribable pain, that unfinished business remains.

The revival I so desperately sought during my days in Buckie has remained elusive and Cumbernauld is not yet freed from the death grip of the lord of darkness. If anything, he has tightened his hold.

But Scotland is not his to rule. Its soul was purchased more than two millennia ago, when a blood stained dead man stepped out of His grave into the breaking dawn of a Jerusalem morning. Thirty five years ago I reclaimed it in His name. And I have never renounced my claim.

Satan, the prince of the powers of the air, battered me to within an inch of my life; until I despaired of this world. But by Grace and Mercy I remain.

I am not the man I was 35 years ago, or even the one he smote 25 years ago. I no longer have the strength or innocence of youth. I bear scars on my soul that will remain until the day all things are made new. But two things remain, unbroken, and unbowed; my calling and my love.

Beginning today, on this 35th anniversary of my first St. Andrew’s Day in Scotland, and the 25th anniversary of the battle for my soul, I am renewing my cry to Heaven for Buckie, for Cumbernauld, for every inch of Scottish soil from the Shetland Islands to Hadrian’s wall, and for every soul who lives within her borders. By the Name and by His blood, Scotland belongs to Jesus.

I would love it if you would join me in weekly prayers for Scotland that works like this: Monday – Highlands and Islands, Tuesday – Grampian (which includes Buckie), Wednesday – Lothian, Thursday – Strathclyde (which includes, Cumbernauld), Friday – Borders, Saturday – Pastors and Evangelists, Sunday – Churches.

Please watch this space and Facebook for announcements of a group dedicated to praying for Scotland.

I guess I’ll finish by quoting John Knox, the great reformer, who was known to cry out this prayer from the streets of Glasgow and Edinburgh, “Give me Scotland, or I die”.

The Most Secular Cities And States In the USA. Will Number 1 Shock You?

USAWhile flipping through radio stations this morning, I heard someone mention ‘the most secular/non-religious cities in the country.’ Frankly, I kept flipping. As the morning progressed, however, that statement kept haunting me, so about 11:00 I stopped what I was doing and headed for Google.

My search for ‘most secular cities in the United States’ turned up quite a few results, some of which were quite recent, but many were several years old, so I’m sure certain data points have changed. The most recent list comes from April of this year and it’s the one I’m going to share in a moment.

In an obvious follow up, I searched for the most secular States. I found some convoluted pages of fairly recent information, but they were not really easy to make sense of, so I settled for a list from 2009 published on “The Friendly Atheist” page on Patheos.

The lists didn’t surprise me much, but they did hurt my heart. I am committing starting today, to pray each day, for one of the cities and one of the States in a 10 day rotation for 30 days. Essentially then, each of them will be prayed for 3 times during the month. I would love it very much if you would consider joining me. I’m also going to pray for my State, Georgia, and our County, Bartow. I encourage you to pray for your State and County, too.

I’m going Pray for God’s blessing. I will pray for the Leaders, The Churches, The economy, and the people. I will pray that God will send a revival among the Churches and will draw unbelievers to Him. I will pray for peace and wisdom.

Every great revival in history has been preceded by and accompanied by, prayer.  It is time, no past time, for the Church to rise up and stop seeking answers in the voting booth, but in the prayer closet. Vote, yes, but remember that real change can’t be regulated or legislated, because it comes from the inside out.

Please use the comment section to let me know if you choose to join the ‘knee party’.

Top 10 most secular cities (Source: Christian Century, April, 2015)

10: Detroit, MI, 9: Columbus, OH, 8: Boston, MA, 7: Los Angeles, CA, 6: Tampa/St Petersburg, FL, 5: Phoenix, AZ, 4: Denver, CO, 3: San Francisco, CA, 2: Seattle, WA, 1: Portland, OR.

Top 10 most Secular States (Source: The Friendly Atheist 2009)

10: Connecticut, 9: Nevada, 8: Rhode Island, 7: Oregon, 6: Washington, 5: Alaska, 4: Massachusetts, 3: Maine, 2: New Hampshire, 1: Vermont.

 

Today we pray for Detroit and Connecticut. Ask, Seek, Knock.