(Re)Discovering The Bible Podcast Relaunch

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After two plus years, we’re back. I’m so excited. Attached are the show notes, in rather unedited form. I just wanted to get the podcast to you. Thanks for waiting. And thanks to you new listeners.

 

 I want to welcome you, or, welcome you back to ReDiscovering the Bible. I’ve been away a long time. A lot has happened since we were last together. My wife and I have moved to North Eastern Scotland. I’m back full time in ministry. I’ve had a heart attack, 4 strokes and had triple bypass surgery to repair the damage. But I feel great, and I’m looking forward renewing our relationship, or getting to know you for the first time, whichever situation describes you and I. For those of you who were regular listeners before, we don’t have farm animals here in Scotland, so we won’t be interrupted by crowing roosters or braying donkeys, or goats calling for their dinner. And the camper, that I used as a recording studio is also a thing of the past.

But one thing that hasn’t changed is the Bible. It’s message is unchangeable. It still points us to Jesus,

I’m looking forward to our time together. For reasons no one can explain, all our old episodes have disappeared. The hosts can’t explain it, but they are doing their best to get them back. But it’s ok with me either way. We’re going to start over. If the old episodes come back, great, if not, most of you are new, anyway, so we’ll do this together.

So let’s get started. What is the Bible? And why do I think it’s such a big deal? First of all, it’s still the best selling book of all time. Plus it’s the most given away book of all time. And each year, it’s best seller. Often, the year’s number one seller. So much so, that most charts just ignore it. The Bible is a category all it’s own.

But while it’s a best seller, and a cherished book to give away, or receive, it’s surprisingly unread. Millions upon millions of copies gather dust and go completely ignored. Yet, it’s subject matter is discussed, and argued about, daily. Many people offer opinions about it without ever reading it. And because their hearers haven’t read it, ignorance is compounded and a huge majority of human beings, especially those in the western world, think they know all about it. And that’s tragic.

Another scary thing, is with the advent of YouTube, ignorance and misunderstanding about the Bible has exponentially increased. Oh there’s some great stuff out there, but there are also hours and hours of drivel and garbage. Frankly, and sadly, people don’t go to Church anymore so they don’t know how much garbage is being published. And, even worse is, there are many Churches teaching junk as well. It gives me a headache just thinking about it all.

So I decided to address the subject for the ordinary person. My books are simple. My podcasts are simple. My sermons are simple. We’re all starting from the beginning. Some of us all over again. Since I have a face for radio, I’m focusing on podcasts and books rather that YouTube. I may sometime try a video or two, but like I said, I have a face ideal for radio, so why push my luck.

I do have two e books available on Amazon, if you want to read them. They are called Rediscovering the Bible Vol 1 and 2. The first volume is on the subject of today’s episode, and vol 2 covers the 4 Gospels, and Acts. Matthew Mark, Luke, John, and Acts of the Apostles are the first 5 books of the New Testament.

But what is the Bible? And why should I read it? First, the Bible is not religious. And frankly, Christianity in not a religion. Religion helped create the mess the world is in. Christianity, and it’s Scriptures, are the answer to the problems created by, and without, religion. The Bible is God’s love letter to the Human race. The short version goes like this, The first 4 books of the New Testament tell us Who Jesus is. The next one tells us, what to do about who he is. And how the news about Jesus spread through the Roman empire. The next 21 books tell us how to live as followers of Jesus, and the last book, Revelation, tells us how it’s all going to end.

The Old Testament is different. It’s main purpose is to show how sin came into the world, and what a mess the world was in before Jesus came, and what steps God took through the human race to get the world ready for Jesus. There are some absolutely awesome stories in it. Things that hollywood can only dream of. There are some beautiful songs, some promises and prophesies, and much more. The Old Testament gets a really bad rap, primarily because people don’t pay attention to the why things are happening. That and they don’t read it, but pass their interpretations of things they haven’t read to a public who haven’t read it either. It’s the oldest form of Fake News.

But I’m kind of getting ahead of myself. Surprise Surprise. The word Bible is just the greek word for book. Seriously. It’s an ordinary word that was used by greek speakers everyday. But it’s not a book. It’s actually 66 books in one volume. Like a whole library in one cover. It’s not in chronological order, or even in importance of topic order. Heck it’s not even written in the best order to read it. Seriously.

The best way to read the Bible is to read the New Testament first, then the Old testament. You will understand the flow of the book much better if you do that. In point of fact, I have outlined a reading program for the whole bible in volume 1 of my book. I believe that alone is worth the three bucks the book will set you back. But if you write me either using the comments section of the blog where I put my show notes, www.samburtonpresents.com, or email me at samburtonpresents@gmail.com. I’ll send you a New Testament reading plan at no charge. I put this plan together to give you the best possible way of reading the Bible to get the most out of it.

The Bible calls itself, “God Breathed”, meaning it comes from the very breath of God. It’s his heart. He’s the ultimate author, as he guided the authors of each book in areas of correct doctrine and history. You will hear claims that the Bible contradicts itself, but that is not the case. That is ignorance or bias speaking. We’ll look at those supposed contradictions as we go along.

Why are there so many translations of the Bible? Now that’s a great question. First of all, the Bible wasn’t written in English at all. Not even King James english. The old Testament was written in Hebrew and Aramaic. Neither of those languages is spoken any more. Modern Hebrew is as different from Biblical Hebrew as Modern American English is from King James English. And for what it’s worth, King James English was different in 1611, when that version came out, than it is in it’s modern form. We’ll come back to that.

The New Testament was written in something called Koine Greek. That is different that either classical greek or Modern Greek. For years, it was called Biblical Greek, because people thought that only the Bible was written this was as some kind of code. But archaeology has shown us conclusively, that the Koine Greek of the Bible was the way people spoke in the first century A.D. We now have thousands of books from that time period that demonstrate that classical Greek was formal, or generally accepted, but that Koine was the commonly spoken variety. Much like we all have our own dialects of english.

This shows us that God was trying to be understood rather than being formal or grammatically correct. And the New Testament was translated into the commonly spoken languages literally as soon as early evangelists entered those countries.

But language changes over time. So lovers of the Bible have translated it repeatedly as we have better understanding of the original languages and as our own spoken English changes. That’s also why there are often updated editions of various translations.

I encourage you to try out several, to see which one you like best. You can do that for free. They are pretty much all available via apps for your phone, or via google on your home computer or laptop.

Just search Bible on your phones app store, and you’ll see loads of options. To save space on my phone, I settled on YouVersion as my app. I’ve downloaded multiple versions so that I don’t require internet access every time I want to use it. There are other excellent apps. I’ve used most of them. On your home computer try Biblegateway.com. There are many translations there. You can try them out and see which you like best.

Again, there are loads of good places to find translations, I’m just trying to keep things as easy as possible here on the radio show.

If you want a Bible study tool, and you have a laptop or desktop, I highly recommend, e-sword.net. I’ve used it for 20 years. You can download many translations, commentaries, old books, maps, and more. The tool is free. You can make donations if you like. I made a donation some years ago, because the program is so valuable to me.

If you want recommendations for translations, I’m going to give you three here. First of all is the English Standard Version. It’s a solid translation. While it’s not my all time favorite, it’s what I currently preach from. It has become extremely popular in strong Bible Believing Churches over the last 8 or 10 years.

Next is the New Living Translation. This is my wife’s favorite. Again, it’s extremely popular and strong.

The third, surprises a lot of old timers, but it’s the Good News Bible. It used to be called, Good New For Modern Man. Each edition of it has gotten better than the one before it. If you are not a good reader, or if English is not your first language, this translation is for you. I absolutely love it.

You’ll note, I didn’t mention the King James, aka The Authorized Version. That translation is historically very important. It changed everything for the Protestant Reformation in England and the British Colonies. It was an excellent version for it’s time, written in the everyday common language of the people.

I grew up reading the King James. I still love certain parts of it, like the 23rd psalm, and the Christmas story from Luke chapter 2. But it is not even close to the most precise translation available to people today. Those who say it is the ‘only Bible to use’ are mistaken. On the other hand, it is not a bad translation. If you still love the KJV, use it. That’s fine.

If you have questions about another translation, feel free to write and ask me about it. I will be totally honest with you. These three are recommendations for those of your who don’t know where to start or don’t have a Bible.

One thing I want to mention is there are some things about the Bible that are NOT inspired. The chapters and verses. The Bible was written without those. They were added later to help people in memorization and to serve as bookmarks to know where they stopped and started reading. The chapters were introduced by Stephen Langton in the early 1200s. And the verses weren’t added until the mid 1500s by Robert Estienne.

Also, just for the record, neither is the paper, ink, or cover of your Bible. Leather editions, and Red Letter editions are sometimes considered more valuable that hardbacks, paperbacks, or e-versions. It is the message, not the vessel that’s important.

I recommend you try and read at least a little every day. Even if it’s only a chapter or two. Start with the Gospel of Luke, then Read the book of Acts of the Apostles. They were written by the same guy, so the flow is good. Like I said, you can get my entire Bible reading plan from Vol 1 of Rediscovering the Bible, or I’ll send you the New Testament plan absolutely free, if you write me and request it.

Gosh, I’m glad you stopped by today. That’s all I’ve got for now. I’ll be back next week. Have a good one. For now, I’m out…..

Good Friday Sermon Scandalizes Scottish Fishing Village

chapel1.jpg (420×280)That was not the actual headline in the local paper, but I expected it to be. I hadn’t intended to create a crisis that Friday evening, all I wanted to do was preach a sound Gospel sermon, but, boy howdy, did I get more than I bargained for. Grab a cup of coffee and I’ll give you the details.

For the record, Easter Sunday, 1981 fell on April 19, which means Good Friday was the 17th.  The week had been remarkably uneventful, but would certainly not end that way. It was my first Easter in Scotland. I had moved to Birmingham, England the July before, and found my way to the breathtaking Moray village of Buckie, in Northeast Scotland, October of the same year.

I fell in love with Buckie the moment I stepped foot in the town. Love at first sight, that’s the only way I can describe it. That first winter was long, dark, damp, and cold. I spent it getting to know the people, customs, thoughts and core values of this historic fishing community. I remember long afternoons, sitting in front of coal fires, sipping tea, munching on cakes of different kinds, and being regaled with stories of days gone by, as recalled by elderly Church members and other local citizens. I can still feel the radiant heat of the fires as they warded of the chill of the Scottish winter.  I can taste the tea, and If I try hard enough, I can almost smell the sooty, tangy aroma of the coal and occasional brick of peat as the low flames labored to lull me to sleep.

Shortly after arriving in Buckie, I was invited to join the local ministers’ fraternal, which I eagerly accepted. Despite being from south of the Mason Dixon, complete with Kentucky drawl, I was, in the eyes of local Scots, a Yank, and there was no point trying to explain American cultural differences.

As an American, I was a curiosity, and many of the local pastors and congregations wanted to know all about my background and why a Yankee (the title still rubs be the wrong way 😉 ) would come so far to serve a congregation that most in town thought had been closed for years. In my youthful exuberance, I explained my motivation and desire to build a vibrant, growing congregation that would ignite a revival that would sweep the entire country.  Many, including the elders at the Church I served, merely chuckled at my dream, a few discarded it as fantasy talk, and a handful considered it hubris.

The winter found me speaking most weeks at various youth clubs, women’s groups and local schools. After all, having an American in town was a genuine novelty.  I enjoyed every minute of it. The people were so welcoming, despite making it clear that I was an outsider. People listened to my message, but held me at arms length. It would be nearly 4 years before I felt genuinely embraced.

As spring approached, I learned that Holy Week, the week between Palm Sunday and Easter, was a grand week of Ecumenical celebration in Buckie. There would be community breakfasts and joint worship services held each night at various Church Buildings in the town. The congregation I served would not be hosting, which is just as well, because our facility was in a dire state of repair. I’ll describe more of that another day.

The week would reach a crescendo on Good Friday evening with the worship service being held at the local Scottish Episcopal Church. The ministers’ fraternal asked me to preach that service. I was honored and humbled beyond my ability to find words.

I spent hours and hours preparing my message. I would preach from Matthew’s account of the crucifixion, chapter 27, with special emphasis on verses 51 through 53, where the curtain in the temple was torn and graves were opened and many saints were raised from the dead.

It is such a powerful, hope filled passage that I couldn’t resist.  The day is called GOOD Friday, because Jesus death brings Life.

It’s hard to forget, even 35 years later, how nervous I was that evening. The other ministers in town would sit behind me, with all except the Salvation Army Officer wearing varying colors of robes and clerical collars. It was quite intimidating seeing them in all their pomp, while I mingled  among the congregants clad in my dress trousers, with a tie and cardigan. I didn’t even own a suit, much less a robe and collar. One of the more senior pastors offered me one of his robes, but like David of old, I refused, just as the boy who would be king, refused the armor Saul offered him before the great encounter with Goliath.

To this day, I have no idea how my lack of traditional clergy attire was received by the mixed congregants, but it paled in comparison to the reception my message garnered.  Of that, I am certain.

As I stood before the combined worshippers from many different denominational traditions, I felt confident in the fact that by preaching directly from Scripture, I was on solid ground; foolish boy. I was a bit disappointed to see only one member from the Church I served in attendance. To be fair, the members from the Buckie Church of Christ were elderly and most were in varying degrees of failing health. Only Richard Souter, one of our Elders, had braved the night chill to come in support. It would be another few months before attendances at our Church would begin to pick up and real growth emerge from the hard packed spiritual soil of the Moray Firth region.

God was truly with me that night as I preached my heart out.  I still recall many parts of the sermon and the fact that every eye was fixed on me as I described the agony of the cross, the victory of Resurrection and the hope available by turning to Christ. I even offered an invitation to receive Jesus. Apparently that was a no no.

After the service, the response was overwhelming. I was surrounded by crowds of people asking me questions about the Gospel. Several wanted me to help them find the passage I’d preached from. One person said, ‘I’ve been going to Church my whole life and I never heard this’. Another said, “I had to look the passage up for myself, because I thought this was something only in your Yank Bible.”

What a night. I stood among the fisher folk for what seemed ages, sharing the Scriptures and explaining the Gospel. I returned home filled with indescribable joy. God had been let loose from some invisible box, and He had used my Kentucky tongue to open the door.

By Wednesday, word reached me that several Churches in town were in an uproar, especially those from either a ‘High Church’ (Liturgical), or a theologically liberal, background. I guess there was even a hastily called Ministers’ meeting to which I was not invited.

It would seem that my Good Friday message really struck some tribal chords and the natives were getting restless.  Some of the more liberal Pastors were fit to be tied. This ‘Evangelical Preaching’ had no place in ecumenical gatherings. It was just ‘too controversial’.

The big news came from the Scottish Episcopal Church, where after learning of Friday night’s shenanigans, the Bishop made and announcement that I would never again be allowed to preach from their pulpit.

To be fair, I did have my backers. Two of the area Church of Scotland Pastors, the Baptist preacher, and my dear friend Ray, the Salvation Army Officer, defended the message as orthodox and appropriate. The majority, however, were, if not outraged, offended. My primary crime was not, preaching that the Biblical account was accurate, but that turning to Jesus in repentance and being ‘born again’ was simply not, as they say, Cricket.  My American Revivalism needed to be curbed.  And they curbed it.

From that day forward, I was never again invited to speak in a good portion of Churches, and I certainly was never again a preacher for a community event. I was denied the opportunity to meet the queen when she came to town a few years later (as were other Evangelical Pastors). There were other ‘punishments’ levied, but you get the point.

Frankly, I was glad that tar and feathering had not been a part of NE Scottish tradition. For a few weeks, the small town had something juicy to chew on. Then it vanished from talk nearly as suddenly as it had arrived. For that small mercy, I’m eternally grateful.

In all, I spent 7 glorious years ministering in Buckie. They were seven of the very best years of my life. We overcame that rocky start and saw God do many great things. I moved away in 1987 to plant a Church in Cumbernauld in the Scottish midlands, and have some great memories and friends from that time, too, but I would be less than honest if I didn’t confess that a large part of my heart still walks up and down West Church Street and occupies a seat in the back of the Buckie Church of Christ at the Corner of West Church and Pringle Streets. And, every single Good Friday, my mind goes back to that first Good Friday I spent in Buckie. Those were halcyon days. And, by the way, Jesus is still opening the grave and scandalizing the multitudes. Hallelujah! He is risen!

 

 

Episode 17 – The Gospel of Luke

 

God’s Route 66 Part 3

Listen here

 

Author: Luke – Physician, Companion of Apostle Paul, Gentile, Historian, Author of Acts

Date Written – Mid 50s – A.D. 66

Recipient – ‘Theophilus’ Probably a real individual as the name is not uncommon in the first century, but possibly a pseudonym for ‘Christian’ as the name literally means, friend or lover of God.

Focus – To establish the universality of the Gospel by identifying Jesus as ‘The Son of Man’. Since Luke is a Gentile and ‘Theophilus’ is a Gentile name, it is safe to assume that the earliest appeal was for a Gentile Audience.

Key Passages – 1:1-4, Chapter 2, 3:16, 4:18-21, 10:1-9, 10:25-37

 

Episode 13 – Prime Directive Part 4 –

To Listen, Click Here

Luke 10:1-11

  1. A model for world evangelism.
  2. There’s nothing wrong with the harvest, there’s just a shortage of farmers.
  3. Step 1. Pray. Bless
  4. Step 2. Stay Remain in the same house
  5. Step 3. Care. Heal the sick. Find a need and meet it. Find a hurt and heal it. Meet physical needs
  6. Step 4. Share. Announce the arrival of the Kingdom.

Seek Heaven. Identify with community. We’re not a hit and run, one night stand kind of kingdom.. Meet felt needs. They can only be truly learned by being there and identifying. It’s only when a community can see how much care that they will care about what we say. But in the end, all the praying and caring in the world, only matters once we share the Gospel.

Here’s a link for the 1984 edition of the NIV Bible

Thanks for stopping by; Please use the comments section for questions or feedback. We love interacting.

No Wonder There’s A War On Christmas – Scandalous, Part 5

Royal Seal of King Hezekiah
Royal Seal of King Hezekiah

Rediscovering the Bible Online Radio Show – Episode 8 is on the air.

 

  1. Royal Seal of King Hezekiah of Judah has been found. The weird part is it took 6 years to make it public… Read about it here
  2. Question from a listener related to the women in the family tree of Jesus is asked and answered
  3. Some of the things said about Jesus in the Christmas Story as told in Matthew and Luke no doubt fuel the ‘War on Christmas’. Especially the names and titles used for him;
    1. Jesus – The Lord Saves – Savior  – Matthew 1:21 , Luke 2:112. Son of God – Luke 1:35 – John 10:29-33

      3. Emmanuel – God With Us-Matthew 1:23

      4. Christ – Luke 2:11

      5. The Lord -Luke 2:11, John 8:58

  4. Each of these names and titles distinguishes Jesus from other religious leaders and points to Him as the Divine Son of God. Pretty dramatic claims.
  5. Link to Show